What is Hanahaki Disease? – Is It Real?

What is Hanahaki Disease?

What is Hanahaki Disease? – Is It Real?

The Hanahaki Disease is an illness born from one-sided love, where the patient throws up and coughs up flower petals when they suffer from one-sided love. The infection can be removed through surgery, but the feelings disappear along with the petals.

The Hanahaki Disease is an illness born from unrequited love, where the patient’s throat will fill up with flower, they will then proceed to throw, and cough up the petals, (sometimes even the flowers). One of the only ways for the disease to ‘disappear’ is if, the said person returns the feeling (it can’t be resolved with friendship, it has to be genuine feelings of love).

The infection can also be removed through surgery, though the feelings disappear along with the petals. If they choose nether options, or the feeling is not returned in time, then the patient’s lungs will fill up with flowers, and will eventually suffocate.

There is no specific flower for the disease, but it’ll either be the crushes favourite type of flower, or their favourite colour. We can only hope for the patients, and pray that the crushes favourite flower isn’t a type of rose.

(The length of the disease varies with each person. But on an average, it will last up to 2 or 3 mouths, but sometime it’ll only last, a couple weeks).

Is the Hanahaki disease real?

Hanahaki Disease is a fictional disease in which the victim coughs up flower petals when they suffer from one-sided love. It ends when the beloved returns their feelings (romantic love only; strong friendship is not enough), or when the victim dies.

It can be cured through surgical removal, but when the infection is removed, the victim’s romantic feelings for their love also disappear.

The trope was popularized in East Asian fandoms before it was used by Westerners. In fandom, it appears most frequently in relation to BL pairings.

The Hanahaki Disease trope is not used exclusively within fandom – many people have become intrigued by the concept and created non-fannish artwork, poetry, songs, music videos and other creative works based around the concept.

However, Hanahaki Disease is particularly popular within fandom due to its potential for angst, hurt/comfort, pining, and general romantic tension.

Origins

The term hanahaki comes from the Japanese words hana, which means “flower”, and hakimasu, which means “to throw up”.

The Hanahaki Disease trope was popularized with the Japanese shoujomanga, (Hanahaki Otome), or The Girl Who Spit Flowers by Naoko Matsuda, which was released in 2009.

The symptoms of the disease are summarized to strong pain, having flowers blooming in the heart and lungs, and then throwing them up.

However, among East Asian (Japanese and Korean especially) fans and creators, the concept of flower regurgitation due to unrequited love dates to before Hanahaki Otome’s release. Its true origins are currently unknown.

Versions

This trope has several variations and is used in both happy and tragic stories. It often develops over months or even years, beginning with coughing up a few petals and growing in intensity (and pain) until the victim is vomiting entire flowers, by which point the disease has entered its final stages.

The happy ending version is when the object of the victim’s love returns their affections, thus making the love no longer unrequited. The victim is then cured of the disease.

This may happen spontaneously when the object of affections realizes his (it’s usually him) love, or the disease may require the object to persuade the victim that their love is mutual. If the victim cannot believe that his beloved returns his love, he will die.

The most common version is when the victim’s lungs get filled with the flowers and roots grow in their respiratory system. They choke on their own blood and petals and die. It is popular due to the angst that comes with character death.

Another version is when the flowers are surgically removed, as are the victim’s feelings of love, meaning they can no longer love the person they once loved.

Sometimes this also removes their memories of the former beloved, or the victim’s ability to ever love again. Often, the one suffering the disease will refuse the surgery, preferring to die rather than losing their feelings.

Many artists and authors tend to use cherry blossoms as the flower of the petals that characters cough up, although it’s not uncommon for the flower to be something significant to the characters.

Flower symbolism is also popular in western fandom, for example, to represent the victim’s affections or personality, or that of their loved one.

What Happens To Victims Of Hanahaki Disease?

When one develops this fictitious disease called Hanahaki, a lot of things can happen. It is reported that people who suffer from this disease cough up flower petals.

Now the factor responsible for this sickness is unrequited love. It simply means loving someone and not getting loved in return.

Let me use Peter (a man) and Jane (a woman) to demonstrate the meaning of this disease. Assuming both of them (Peter and Jane) are close. Peter loves Jane to the point that he can take a bullet for her.

Unfortunately, the relationship is one-sided. Peter loves Jane, but Jane doesn’t love or feel the same way.

According to the Hanahaki disease, Peter may develop this disease due to unrequited love. In this case, his lungs will become filled with flowers and their roots, growing in his respiratory tract.

The only way Peter can become better is for Jane to return his love. The disease can also be removed via surgical operation. But if urgent action is not taken, the victim may die.

What Happens After Surgically Removing Hanahaki Disease?

Sometimes, it is beneficial to go under the knife. Ask those who have, and you will discover that most of the people had their disabilities corrected. But the Hanahaki disease is quite different.

When the disease is taken off the victim through a surgical operation, things are bound to go wrong. The surgery will automatically take away the victim’s feeling of love. And as a consequence, he or she might not be able to lexpress ove again.

The surgery might also remove the feelings of the victim, making him unable to love the person he once loved.

Can You Catch HanaHaki Disease?

It looks different for different people. The trick is to try out different methods and do plenty of self-reflection. That’s how you can figure out what works for you.

For many people, pausing and taking a few deep breaths helps them manage their emotions. Others find it helps to listen to music, read a book, or exercise.

Stepping away from a difficult situation helps many people manage their emotions. If you’re feeling overwhelmed by emotion, try taking a break.

Cook and eat a meal. Go for a long walk. Do something you enjoy to get your mind off of it. When you come back, you’ll probably feel more able to handle the issue—and your reaction to it.

You may not really be at risk of catching HanaHaki Disease, but heartache itself can certainly feel like an illness. Have you ever found yourself nursing a broken heart?

We hope not! If it ever does happen, try out a few of the strategies we talked about. You may be surprised how much better you feel.

Find a friend or family member who can help you with these activities!

Everyone has their own way of regulating their emotions. Talk to an adult you know, like a family member, teacher, or doctor. Ask them how they regulate their emotions. Can they offer you strategies to try? What works best for them?

HanaHaki isn’t the only fictional disease out there. Read about a few others, like Dragon Pox or Hawaiian Cat Flu. Do you think either of these illnesses could have had real-world inspiration? Discuss with a friend or family member.

Think about the last time you felt a very strong emotion. Why were you feeling the emotion? How did you feel physically? What were you thinking about? How did you react to how you felt? Write a short personal narrative about what you felt and how you reacted to it.

What are some fictional diseases like the Hanahaki Disease?

Ancient virus: a rare viral strain found in Queen ant genes. Discovered by ‘Alexia Ashford’ when she was studying ants. When combined with the progenitor virus it creates the powerful t-Veronica virus.

Angel toxicosis: causes victim to eventually lose ability to taste, sleep, cry, feel pain, and talk. Also increases the victims hearing, strength and sight abilities.

As well as eliminating the need to eat and sleep. In the early beginnings it allows victims to gain crystal like wings and fly until the disease is destroyed. The final stage of this disease causes the victim to give up his/her heart and memory.

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Conclusion

The Hanahaki Disease is an illness born from one-sided love, where the patient throws up and coughs up flower petals when they suffer from one-sided love. The infection can be removed through surgery, but the feelings disappear along with the petals.

The Hanahaki Disease is an illness born from unrequited love, where the patient’s throat will fill up with flower, they will then proceed to throw, and cough up the petals, (sometimes even the flowers). One of the only ways for the disease to ‘disappear’ is if, the said person returns the feeling (it can’t be resolved with friendship, it has to be genuine feelings of love).

The term hanahaki comes from the Japanese words hana, which means “flower”, and hakimasu, which means “to throw up”.

The Hanahaki Disease trope was popularized with the Japanese shoujomanga, (Hanahaki Otome), or The Girl Who Spit Flowers by Naoko Matsuda, which was released in 2009.

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2 thoughts on “What is Hanahaki Disease? – Is It Real?”

  1. Hello there! I could have sworn I’ve been to this blog before but after checking through some of the post I realized it’s new to me. Anyways, I’m definitely happy I found it and I’ll be book-marking and checking back often!

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